Yearly Archives: 2014

Home/2014

cornucopia and southwest airlines

Cornucopia

 

Doug warmly welcomed the group and requested healing thoughts and prayers be sent out to our friend and neighbor, Betty Davidson for a full and speedy recovery from an aneurysm.

Kathy encouraged us to be a little bit better with a variety of thoughts and quotes on the theme of cornucopia.

The universe operates through dynamic exchange . . . giving and receiving are different aspects of the flow of energy in the universe, and in our willingness to give that which we seek, we keep the abundance of the universe circulating in our lives. ~Deepak Chopra

See more of Kathy’s quotes from Dr. Paul Farmer, Maya Angelou, & Paul Coelho on the Inspirations page

As a prelude to a brief meditation, Ron recounted his week’s experiences from the highs of time with loving grandchildren to the lows of losing friends and shared a dream that brought a reminder of constant need to attend to our powerful egos.

Ross played a thoughtful selection of swinging tunes from the late 30’s:  Over The Rainbow, God Bless The Child, Pennies From Heaven.  How fortunate we are that Ross is so willing to share his abundant talent.

Terry shared thoughts on gratitude and happiness and her explanation of how conscious gratitude has brought her abundant happiness despite six bouts with cancer was truly inspiring!

And Erin found a way to turn a personal adventure on Southwest Airlines into an entertaining allegorical tale on the topic of abundance:

Not long ago I was at the San Diego airport, again, waiting for a flight. This is not a new experience for me, though this time was actually somewhat different. Normally, in order to accumulate miles and elite status, I fly United Airlines or one of its partners. But on this particular trip, flying to Reno, Nevada, United was much more expensive, with much less preferable flight schedules. So, I wound up, for the first time in a long time, on Southwest Airlines.

Just the thought of Southwest Airlines makes some people nervous – no seat assignment? Will I have to fight for my place? Somehow the opening of the Hunger Games comes to mind – with everyone fighting over his or her share of the cornucopia…

Being the somewhat privileged traveler that I am, I took advantage of paying an extra $12 to get bumped up closer to the front of the line – not the front, but at least not the back. Since I was only to be gone a few days, all I had was a carry on rolling suitcase – of the small, able to fit in the overhead style – and a purse. Actually, that’s what I fly with almost always. When I fly United I know that I will have room for my roller bag as my status gives me privilege in boarding the plane. But this time I was on Southwest and I could feel myself getting a bit nervous as the boarding time neared.

Boarding SouthwestThat was when I noticed it – or, rather them. A […]

By |2020-02-15T12:49:16-08:00November 10th, 2014|Talks|Comments Off on cornucopia and southwest airlines

Please Don’t Cry

Erin Dunigan -  Photo by Marty Harriman Erin Dunigan – Photo by Marty Harriman

Who would think that the topic of “Loss” could be anything but a little sad? We should know by now that any topic in the care and thoughtfulness of Erin would be thought-provoking and inspiring, help us dig a little deeper into long-held beliefs, make us laugh, and of course include wonderful metaphors from her passion for permaculture and gardening.  Afterwards, many were heard saying, “It was the best ever.”

We missed Bernie, Kathy encouraging us to “be a little better,”  Ron leading us in meditation,  and Steve’s final comments, but it was another great topic and another stirring Sunday overlooking the beautiful Pacific at David Gee’s Hacienda del Encanto.

Erin found a way to lighten the topic without glossing it over, Ross’s music was spot-on, Doug’s poem touching and Carmen’s presentation from the beloved Macristy of Mexicali , “To My Friends,”  all came together to help us see that there is more to loss than grief and crying.

TO MY FRIENDS
IF YOU LOVE ME, PLEASE DON’T CRY……..

IF YOU ONLY KNEW THE UNFATHOMABLE MYSTERY OF THE HEAVEN WHERE I AM NOW.

IF YOU COULD ONLY SEE AND FEEL WHAT I FEEL IN THESE INFINITE HORIZON AND LIGHT THAT REACHES AND PENETRATES EVERYTHING.
I AM ABSORBED BY THE ENCHANTMENT OF GOD AND BY ITS INFINITE EXPRESSIONS OF BEAUTY.

IN THIS NEW LIFE, ALL PAST THINGS ARE SMALL AND INSIGNIFCANT.

BUT MY AFECTION FOR ALL OF YOU IS STILL INTACT AS WELL AS THE TENDERNESS THAT WAS HARD TO REVEAL WHEN I WAS WITH YOU.

EVERYTHING THAT I LIVED WHILE ON EARTH WAS FLEETING AND LIMITED.
NOW I LIVE IN THE SERENE EXPECTATION TO SEE YOU ALL HERE, SOME DAY.

THINK OF MY NEW ABODE WHERE DEATH DOESN’T EXIST AND WHERE I AM WITH THE UNENDING FOUNTAIN OF JOY AND LOVE.

IF YOU REALLY LOVE ME, PLEASE DON’T CRY FOR ME.

I AM IN PEACE,

MACRISTY

Not Church Oct 12, 2014 Photo by Marty Harriman Not Church Oct 12, 2014
Photo by Marty Harriman

 

By |2014-10-14T09:20:21-07:00October 14th, 2014|Inspirations|Comments Off on Please Don’t Cry

Ripening
September 14, 2014

Strawberries Ripening © Erin Dunigan Strawberries Ripening © Erin Dunigan

For most of human history, it’s as if we have had long spring-times and only the briefest of summers, a lot of time to put down roots and sprout but almost none to mature. But now, around the world and especially in the developed countries, more people are living longer, healthier lives than ever before. Our normal life span, which stayed at an almost steady twenty years for most of human history , has leapt in an evolutionary eyeblink to seventy-eightyears in the West. Why is this so important? Think about how helpless we are as infants and children compared to other species. It takes us so long to be able to live without our parents’ support, so very long to develop our intelligence and adaptability and skills, to grow in our capacity for compassion and wisdom, good judgment, and discernment. To put it bluntly, it takes all of us a frightfully long time to grow up and many of us never do.

The sudden spurt in longevity over the last fifty years has changed the landscape for growing old. Doesn’t that make you wonder what these years are for? That’s precisely what I’ve been wondering for the past twenty years: How do I make the time ahead count? How can my generation and the ones coming after us not just fritter our later years away, not doze through our aging?  – Sherry Ruth Anderson, “Ripening Time.”

The question I bring before us this morning is a simple one – as we journey through the chronology of our lives, are we ripening, or are we merely rotting? The rotting, of course, is inevitable – the ripening is not.

The next question is, what will we do about it?

What does ripening look like? How does it happen?

BananasMost of us are familiar with the situation of fruit in our grocery stores – bananas that come from Ecuador, picked green – I’ve seen them there at the port in Guayaquil – and shipped around the world. This is done since a green banana travels much better than a ripe one. So, they are kept intentionally immature so that they travel better. Once they reach their destination, the ripening process can be induced – artificially. The primary chemical that is at play in ripening is ethylene – it is that which is fostered when you put your fruit in a brown paper bag to help it ripen. It’s enhanced if you put an apple core or a banana peel in the bag – increasing the ethylene and thus the ripening.

What’s the big deal? It seems to work, doesn’t it? The fruit can travel better, then it ripens on demand – sounds ideal.

Except…

tree-ripened-peachWhen fruit is allowed to ripen on the tree, or the vine, or the plant, it’s ripening happens from the […]

By |2020-02-15T12:50:41-08:00September 17th, 2014|Talks|Comments Off on Ripening
September 14, 2014

Ripening

September 14, 2014

For most of human history, it’s as if we have had long spring-times and only the briefest of summers, a lot of time to put down roots and sprout but almost none to mature. But now, around the world and especially in the developed countries, more people are living longer, healthier lives than ever before. Our normal life span, which stayed at an almost steady twenty years for most of human history , has leapt in an evolutionary eyeblink to seventy-eightyears in the West. Why is this so important? Think about how helpless we are as infants and children compared to other species. It takes us so long to be able to live without our parents’ support, so very long to develop our intelligence and adaptability and skills, to grow in our capacity for compassion and wisdom, good judgment, and discernment. To put it bluntly, it takes all of us a frightfully long time to grow up and many of us never do.

The sudden spurt in longevity over the last fifty years has changed the landscape for growing old. Doesn’t that make you wonder what these years are for? That’s precisely what I’ve been wondering for the past twenty years: How do I make the time ahead count? How can my generation and the ones coming after us not just fritter our later years away, not doze through our aging?  – Sherry Ruth Anderson, “Ripening Time.”

The question I bring before us this morning is a simple one – as we journey through the chronology of our lives, are we ripening, or are we merely rotting? The rotting, of course, is inevitable – the ripening is not.

The next question is, what will we do about it?

What does ripening look like? How does it happen?

BananasMost of us are familiar with the situation of fruit in our grocery stores – bananas that come from Ecuador, picked green – I’ve seen them there at the port in Guayaquil – and shipped around the world. This is done since a green banana travels much better than a ripe one. So, they are kept intentionally immature so that they travel better. Once they reach their destination, the ripening process can be induced – artificially. The primary chemical that is at play in ripening is ethylene – it is that which is fostered when you put your fruit in a brown paper bag to help it ripen. It’s enhanced if you put an apple core or a banana peel in the bag – increasing the ethylene and thus the ripening.

What’s the big deal? It seems to work, doesn’t it? The fruit can travel better, then it ripens on demand – sounds ideal.

Except…

tree-ripened-peachWhen fruit is allowed to ripen on the tree, or the vine, or the plant, it’s ripening happens from the inside. When fruit is picked too early – for commercial and cosmetic reasons […]

By |2020-01-31T16:23:35-08:00September 14th, 2014|Talks|Comments Off on Ripening

Common Ground

Most good things have been said far too often and just need to be lived. ~Shane Claiborne

We don’t think ourselves into new ways of living, we live ourselves into new ways of thinking. ~Richard Rohr

copyright Erin Dunigan © Erin Dunigan

This month our theme is ‘common ground’ – how do we find, connect with, and cultivate that which brings us together even in the midst of so much that threatens to tear us apart?

Last month, for those who were here, we talked about belief – as you might imagine, we here in this place represent more than a few opinions on the subject! There was much conversation, and for many of us – myself included – it stirred up more than it smoothed out. I have to admit, that’s not always comfortable for me! I like things to be clean, orderly, wrapped up. Not messy. Closure. In fact, one time when I had a friend visiting she and I both caught me talking to myself out loud. I began the phrase, “I love me some…” and to her surprise without a pause said, “I love me some order.” Really Erin?? Order? That is not normally the type of word people use in that phrase!

But there is something compelling about a world that makes sense, isn’t there? Something tempting to want to eliminate the gray, the in between, the not yet. It is tempting to want a world without a bunch of loose ends straggling all over the place.

Treasures in Ruins © Erin Dunigan © Erin Dunigan

And yet, when we look around at our world – especially in the last weeks, messy, awful, tragic, violent, fanatical is a lot of what we see, isn’t it? Regardless of what ‘side’ you take on issues that are currently garnering the headlines – the tragedy in Israel and in Gaza. The horror that is sweeping Iraq. The mobs in Paris screaming death to the Jews. The hatred that is being unleashed toward children who are fleeing violence and desperation – and the violence and desperation which is causing them to flee.

I’ve found myself quite weighed down by it all, as of late. Not to mention the things closer to home that remind us that life isn’t always what we intend it to be, that even in our own families, amongst our own neighbors or friends we are faced with challenges.

It’s made me wonder – what can I do? What is to be done? What can possibly be done?

Give More Than You Take Give More Than You Take & copy; Erin Dunigan

The phrase that keeps coming to mind for me is, ‘How do we cure what ails us?’

For some the answer lies in a sort of circling the wagons and rejecting those who believe/think/act differently from them. How do we cure what ails us? We rid ourselves of those […]

By |2014-08-15T08:22:06-07:00August 15th, 2014|Talks|Comments Off on Common Ground

Passover 2014

Passover 2013 © Erin Dunigan Passover 2013 © Erin Dunigan

Bob Wolf, Ron de Jong Passover 2013 Bob Wolff, Ron de Jong Passover 2013

The 2nd Annual  La Misión Passover Seder will be held on Tuesday, April 15th.

Reservations are required for this sit-down pot-luck meal.  The traditional service led by Bob Wolff and Ron de Jong will include reading of the Hagadah La Misión/Not-Church style, of course.

We will be following the Maxwell House Haggadah (provided upon arrival) and will begin PROMPTLY so please be on time.

Some Passover foods also will be provided, but this is a Potluck, so please bring a dish for 10 to share and a bottle of wine. (There’s a lot of wine-drinking at Passover.)

As this is Pesach, please AVOID bringing a dish that uses LEAVEN (no bread, no flour, no pasta) – meat or veggie dishes are great.  There are guidelines below whether you want to go traditional or not.

seder-platePassover Food Guidelines
Food for Passover should include no pork or shellfish and no mixing of dairy and meat in the same dish. Food should have no leavening (bread, flour, pasta, baking powder, baking soda), or any grain based products other than Passover Matzo.

More than any other Jewish holiday, eating is a big part of Passover and every family has favorite dishes and their own personal style.  Here are some links that provide some background and food ideas:

Seder Plate Explained
Traditional Passover Recipes
The Shiksa’s Passover Potluck
Passover Food – Background & Recipes
Spinach with Pine Nuts Casserole
Mock Chopped Liver

Contact Erin Dunigan for reservations.  Time and location of the seder will be emailed to you with your confirmation.  We hope to see you!

By |2020-01-31T16:08:21-08:00April 12th, 2014|Events|Comments Off on Passover 2014